Sunday, October 21, 2012

The Shroud of Turin: 2. What is the Shroud of Turin?

This is part 6, "2. What is the Shroud of Turin?" a sub-contents page in my series, "The Shroud of Turin." The series was originally titled, "The Shroud of Jesus?" but I have changed it to "The Shroud of Turin," so that posts in the series are more easily found using a search engine. Each contents topic below will be linked to a page with that heading. The previous page was part 5, "1.3 The central dilemma of the Shroud." For more information about this series see the main Contents page, part 1.

[Above (click to enlarge): "Descent from the Cross with the Holy Shroud," by Giovanni Battista della Rovere (c. 1575-c. 1640) or Giulio Clovio (1498–1578): Wikipedia. This aquatint print accurately[1] depicts from the information on the Shroud of Turin how Jesus' body was laid on the bottom half of the Shroud and then the top half was taken over His head and overlapped at His feet. See above the front and back, head to head, image on the Shroud held by angels, with the anachronistic burn marks from a fire in 1532]


THE SHROUD OF TURIN
CONTENTS
2. WHAT IS THE SHROUD OF TURIN?
© Stephen E. Jones

  1. A linen sheet
  2. The Shroud's location
  3. The man on the Shroud
  4. The wounds
  5. The bloodstains
  6. The other marks:

NOTES
1. Except that it wrongly shows Jesus' right hand on top of His left. (Wilson, I., 1998, "The Blood and the Shroud: New Evidence that the World's Most Sacred Relic is Real," Simon & Schuster: New York NY, p.137).


Continued in part 7, "2.1 A linen sheet."

Last updated: 4 June, 2013.

1 comment:

Stephen E. Jones said...

Here is a comment I posted to Dan Porter's blog, in response to him querying my note above:

>1. Except that it wrongly shows Jesus' right hand on top of His left. (Wilson, I., 1998, "The Blood and the Shroud: New Evidence that the World's Most Sacred Relic is Real," Simon & Schuster: New York NY, p.137).

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Dan ... The quote from Wilson is:

"Exactly as in the case of the seventeenth-century G. B. della Rovere aquatint depicting how the Shroud’s image was formed, we can see how the Byzantine artist-embroiderer had depicted the lance-wound correctly on the mirror- reverse side to that in which it appears on the Shroud proper, but has forgotten that the same rule must also apply to the crossing of the hands." (Wilson, I., "The Blood and the Shroud," Simon & Schuster: New York NY, 1998, p.137)

... Click on the image of della Rovere’s aquatint above to enlarge it. Note that in the copy of the Shroud held by angels, the spear wound bloodstain is on the opposite side of the uppermost hand.

But on the Shroud itself the spear wound is in Jesus’ right side. You and your readers can verify this for yourselves by printing out a copy of the positive image of the Shroud, e.g. from ShroudScope‘s Durante 2002 Vertical (not the Enrie black and white negative photograph). Hold the printed out Shroud copy in front of [and above] you and imagine it is laid over your body, as it would have been laid over Jesus’ body. You will note that the spear in the side bloodstain is on your right side. And it is your left hand which is over your right hand.
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Stephen E. Jones