Sunday, June 9, 2013

The Shroud of Turin: 3. The Bible and the Shroud

Here at last is a new section, "3. The Bible and the Shroud," which is part 18 of my series, "The Shroud of Turin." It is a sub-contents page from which links will be made to separate topics pages below as I add them. Some of the topics may be combined into one page. The previous post in this series was part 17, "2.6. The other marks (6): Writing ."

[Right (click to enlarge): The Shroud of Turin, with major bloodstains (outlined in red), which are consistent with the Gospels' accounts of the crucifixion of Jesus Christ: Shroud Scope: Durante 2002: Major bloodstains]

See part 1, the main Contents page, for more information about this series.


THE SHROUD OF TURIN
3. THE BIBLE AND THE SHROUD
© Stephen E. Jones

  1. Introduction
  2. The man on the Shroud
  3. The man on the Shroud and Jesus were scourged
  4. The man on the Shroud and Jesus were beaten
  5. The man on the Shroud and Jesus were crowned with thorns
  6. The man on the Shroud and Jesus were crucified
  7. The man on the Shroud and Jesus were buried (1), (2)
  8. The man on the Shroud and Jesus were enfolded in a linen shroud
  9. The man on the Shroud's body did not decompose
  10. The man on the Shroud's body was resurrected!
  11. Objections
  12. Alternatives
  13. Conclusion


Continued in part 19, "3.1. The Bible and the Shroud: Introduction."

Last updated: 27 February, 2014.

5 comments:

Robert Padgett said...

It may be a surprise to learn a significant source of inspiration behind the 'Enigma' Variations was Secondo Pia's famous photographic negative of the Turin Shroud.

Pia's historic photograph of the Turin Shroud was taken in May 1898 and quickly became an international sensation in the secular and Catholic press. Elgar did not begin to work openly on the Variations until five months later in late October 1898. That makes the timing credible and opportune. References to the Turin Shroud throughout the Variations are consistent with my discovery the Secret Friend of Variation XIII is Jesus Christ. His initials are openly concealed by the Roman numerals with X representing the tenth letter of the alphabet (J), and III the third letter (C).

Speaking of initials, Secondo Pia's are highlighted in Variation II. While publicly dedicated to Hew David Steuart Powell with the initials H.D.S-P., there is an oddly placed hyphen between the S and P that does not appear anywhere in Powell's university records. So why the anomalous hyphen? Answer: To denote another name entirely, that of Secondo Pia. This Hyphen Cipher appears in Variation II, and Secondo means second in Italian. To warm up for trio rehearsals with Elgar and Basil Nevison, Powell would play fast Toccata-like runs on the piano. These distinctly pianistic diatonic runs form the main subject material of Variation II. Observe the first three letters in piano are Pia. The name hidden within the initials of Variation II is none other than Secondo Pia, the first official photographer of the Turin Shroud. I would not be surprised to discover that Powell was an avid photographer.

In the most recent post on my blog I describe six different ciphers that support my theory regarding the connection between the 'Enigma' Variations and the Turin Shroud: http://enigmathemeunmasked.blogspot.com/2013/06/elgars-turin-shroud-enigma-ciphers.html

Stephen E. Jones said...

Robert

>It may be a surprise to learn a significant source of inspiration behind the 'Enigma' Variations was Secondo Pia's famous photographic negative of the Turin Shroud. [...]

Thanks for your comment. I read about your theory on Dan Porter's blog, "The poker holes on the Turin Shroud deliberately put there to designate the cloth as sacred?"

According to Wikipedia, the "Enigma Variations" were:

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Enigma Variations ... Edward Elgar composed his Variations on an Original Theme for Orchestra ("Enigma"), Op. 36, commonly referred to as the Enigma Variations, in 1898–99. It is a set of fourteen variations on a hidden "theme" that is, in Elgar's words, "not played". It is Elgar's best-known large-scale composition, for both the music itself and the enigma behind it.

Elgar dedicated the piece to "my friends pictured within", each variation being an affectionate portrayal of one of his circle of close acquaintances. See Musical cryptogram. The people portrayed in the variations include Elgar's wife Alice, Augustus J. Jaeger and Elgar himself. The enigma is the hidden theme, which has been the subject of much speculation. Various musicians have proposed theories for what melody it could be, although Elgar did not say that that his "theme" was a melody. The enigma could be something else, such as a symbol or a literary theme. Elgar accepted none of the solutions proposed in his lifetime, and, pleased with his little joke, took the secret with him to the grave. ...
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We probably underestimate what an international sensation at the time Secondo Pia's 1898 negative photograph of the Shroud was. Wikipedia lists it as one of the major events of the year 1898:

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1898 ...May 28 – Secondo Pia takes the first photographs of the Shroud of Turin and discovers that the image on Shroud itself appears to be a photographic negative.
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In the past your comment would have been off-topic since there is nothing in it relating to the topic of my post it is under, "The Bible and the Shroud," so to be consistent with my policies (see below) I should have deleted it. But I had recently decided to make an exception for comments under my current post, because: 1) it is hard for commenters to find the most appropriate post of mine to their comment, even though I do have an "Index to this blog's posts"; and 2) they reasonably don't want their comment to be `buried' under an old post which few (if any) except me will see.

However, having said that, I don't want you to take that as a `green light' to post any more comments on my blog about it (unless you want to wait until I post on Secondo Pia's 1898 negative photograph of the Shroud under, "3. History and the Shroud" which however could some time away).

It is interesting, but in the end, "so what?" from the perspective of the authenticity (or otherwise) of the Shroud. Readers who are interested in your theory (which I assume is true-given that Elgar was apparently a devout Roman Catholic) can read about it on your blog, "Elgar's Enigma Theme Unmasked."

Stephen E. Jones
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Comments are moderated. Those I consider off-topic, offensive or sub-standard will not appear. I reserve the right to respond to any comment as a separate blog post.

Bob P. said...

Stephen ;Some depictions of the Shroud show the marks of the flagellation but they are not clear to anyone looking at the Shroud in a normal photograph and they do not appear on the picture of bloodstains here. Are they considered bloodstains or just bruising? Where can one find the best survey of them? Thanks, Bob P.

Stephen E. Jones said...

Bob

>...Some depictions of the Shroud show the marks of the flagellation but they are not clear to anyone looking at the Shroud in a normal photograph and they do not appear on the picture of bloodstains here.

When I publish my next post in this series, "3.3. He was scourged," which should be by next Sunday, I will include photographs of the Roman flagellum scourge mark images on the man of the Shroud.

>Are they considered bloodstains or just bruising?

Both. The scourge marks are contusions, i.e. bruises which are internal bleeding, but some also broke the skin and caused external bleeding.

>Where can one find the best survey of them? Thanks, Bob P.

See the online Ohio 2008 Shroud conference PDF paper, "Scourge bloodstains on the Turin Shroud: an evidence for different instruments used" by Barbara Faccini.

I also will give footnote references from my Shroud books in my next post, "3.3. He was scourged."

Stephen E. Jones

Bob P. said...

Thanks, that is already very helpful as I had not seen that article and look forward to seeing more next week, Cheers, Bob.